Christine Forke, PhD, MSN

Associate Fellow

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Health Interests

Adolescents, Behavioral Health, Violence/Injury Prevention



Current Public-Health Related Activities

Dr. Forke has a strong interest in adolescent health and behaviors, and she has expertise in quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method designs. She has studied a variety of risk behaviors and health outcomes, but her primary interest focuses on identifying and responding to intimate partner violence and examining its impact on children, adolescents, and families. Recently, she has increased her efforts to understand how childhood exposures to violence impact subsequent negative health outcomes and adoption of risk behaviors. In particular, she has examined the relationship between witnessing family violence as child, gender role-modeling, and later experiences with adolescent dating violence. Given her strong interest in the intergenerational transmission of violence, her current work focuses on studying the impact of witnessing and other adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) on health across generations using a trauma-informed lens. Dr. Forke is a member of the Philadelphia ACE Task Force (PATF) Steering Committee, and she co-chairs the PATF Research Committee. The goal of the Committee is to enhance cross-fertilization of ideas that can advance the field of ACE research by building a collaborative network of researchers in the Philadelphia area who are interested in studying household and community level adversities specific to urban and/or impoverished communities. Dr. Forke received undergraduate degrees from the University of Pennsylvania (PENN) in psychology and nursing, a master’s degree in nursing from PENN’s School of Nursing, and a doctoral degree in epidemiology from PENN’s School of Medicine. She is a licensed and nationally-certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner.

Forke CM, Myers RK, Catallozzi M, Schwarz DF.  Relationship violence among male and female college undergraduate students. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 2008;162(7):634-641.

Hirschinger-Blank N, Forke CM, Kenyon A, Myers RK, Zhung X, Schwarz DF.  Feasibility of conducting child abuse research with girls in juvenile detention using Audio-Computer Assisted Self-Interview (ACASI) technology.  Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 2014; 25(2).  Published online Feb 21, 2014. http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/T9TVgkZVb4Pgvfm9wVk5/full,

Cronholm PF, Forke CM, Wade R Jr., Bair-Merritt MH, Davis M, Harkins-Schwarz M, Pachter LM, Fein JA. Adverse childhood experiences: Expanding the concept of adversity.  American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2015;49(3):354-61. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.02.001.

Wade R Jr., Cronholm PF, Fein JA, Forke CM, Davis M, Harkins-Schwarz M, Pachter LM, Bair-Merritt MH.  Household and community-level adverse childhood experiences and adult health outcomes in a diverse urban population. Child Abuse & Neglect, 2016;52:135–145.