Alison M. Buttenheim, PhD, MBA

Alison M. Buttenheim, PhD, MBA
CPHI Senior Fellow

Title: Associate Professor of Nursing and Health Policy, Family and Community Health (Nursing) and Health Policy (Perelman School of Medicine)

Email: abutt@upenn.edu

Public Health Interests:

Behavioral economics, global health, immunization, tobacco cessation, infectious disease, mental health, impact evaluation.

Current Public-Health Related Activities:

Dr. Alison Buttenheim is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Family and Community Health at the School of Nursing. Her research addresses persistent behavior change challenges in public and global. Using the techniques and frameworks of behavioral economics, Alison designs, trials, and scales innovative interventions in the areas of vaccine acceptance, smoking cessation, reproductive health, cancer prevention, and vector control. A recognized evaluation expert, Alison has consulted on several impact evaluation studies in international settings, including village midwife and microfinance programs in Indonesia, school feeding schemes in Laos, and improved sanitation in urban Bangladesh. She earned a PhD in Public Health from the UCLA School of Public Health, and an MBA from the Stanford University Graduate School of Business.  

Select Publications:

Malone SK, Ziporyn T, Buttenheim AM. Applying behavioral insights to delay school start times. Sleep Health. 2017 Sep 30.

Buttenheim AM, Fiks AG, Burson II RC, Wang E, Coffin SE, Metlay JP, Feemster KA. A behavioral economics intervention to increase pertussis vaccination among infant caregivers: A randomized feasibility trial. Vaccine. 2016 Feb 3;34(6):839-45.

Paz-Soldán VA, Bauer KM, Hunter GC, Castillo-Neyra R, Arriola VD, Rivera-Lanas D, Rodriguez GH, Toledo Vizcarra AM, Mollesaca Riveros LM, Levy MZ, Buttenheim AM. To spray or not to spray? Understanding participation in an indoor residual spray campaign in Arequipa, Peru. Global public health. 2016 May 18:1-8.

Su A, Buttenheim AM. Maintenance of smoking cessation in the postpartum period: which interventions work best in the long-term?. Maternal and child health journal. 2014 Apr 1;18(3):714-28.